CPD module development on Industrial heating and cooling

IDRIC Project MIP 4.5

Durham University

Background

Industrial heating and cooling consume over 70% of total industrial energy use, however the energy requirement is mostly met by fossil fuels like gas, oil, solid fuel, and traditionally generated electricity, which leads to significant Greenhouse Gas emissions.

Times and policy are changing and there is now a goal to decarbonise our energy use. There is now a rapid revolution in technologies that will help to decarbonise heating and cooling however currently the awareness of these technologies and their implementation can be improved.

Dr Huashan Bao

Dr Huashan Bao

Principal Investigator
Durham University

Project Team

Durham University:

Dr Richard Williams
Dr Andrew Smallbone
Dr Zhiwei Ma
Prof Tony Roskilly

University of Lincoln:

Prof Joseph Howe

Aim

The key aim is to address, through the development of an online CPD training module, the skill deficit and awareness of low/zero carbon heating and cooling technologies for industrial applications.

More Detail

There has been a rapid evolution in recent years of technologies which utilise, low grade heat, e.g. solar heat and industrial waste heat; clean electricity; clean fuel like hydrogen. These technologies have the potential to significantly reduce Industrial Greenhouse Gas emissions.

This project will improve the awareness of these technologies and introduce their engineering fundamentals.

The project team will liaise with industrial partners, through the northeast and northwest industrial clusters, to ensure that the content is of relevance and pitched correctly. This will direct the depth and breadth of the course material and ensuring that industrial CPD requirements are met. The topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Mechanical vapour compression heat pump for industrial heating
  • Solar heating by various types of solar collectors
  • Centralised / district heating and cooling
  • Biomass heating
  • Hydrogen heating
  • Electric heating with/without storage
  • Thermal driven sorption heat pump /refrigeration
  • Thermochemical energy storage
  • Innovative tri-generation systems
  • Dehumidification and drying

These technologies may use clean energy such as electricity or green hydrogen produced using renewable sources, or they may allow for the use of low grade, low temperature, air source, ground source, water source, or waste heat, potentially integrated with energy storage.

Improved awareness and knowledge of these technologies will help to transition the UKs industrial sectors heating and cooling, which is motivated by climate needs and government policy, whilst at the same time addressing the low carbon skills deficit.

Meet the Team

Dr Richard Williams

Dr Richard Williams

Dr Richard Williams

Durham University

Dr Andrew Smallbone

Dr Andrew Smallbone

Dr Andrew Smallbone

Durham University

Dr Zhiwei Ma

Dr Zhiwei Ma

Dr Zhiwei Ma

Durham University

Prof Tony Roskilly

Prof Tony Roskilly

Prof Tony Roskilly

Durham University

Prof Joseph Howe

Prof Joseph Howe

Prof Joseph Howe

University of Chester

Dr Richard Williams

Dr Richard Williams

Dr Richard Williams

Durham University

Dr Andrew Smallbone

Dr Andrew Smallbone

Dr Andrew Smallbone

Durham University

Dr Zhiwei Ma

Dr Zhiwei Ma

Dr Zhiwei Ma

Durham University

Prof Tony Roskilly

Prof Tony Roskilly

Prof Tony Roskilly

Durham University

Prof Joseph Howe

Prof Joseph Howe

Prof Joseph Howe

University of Chester